Gateway Lab School

Health Information

State Required Screenings:

In the state of Delaware, school nurses are required to screen children for vision and hearing problems yearly depending on their grade. All children in kindergarten and in grades 2 and 4 are tested for vision and hearing. Our students in grade 5 and grade 6 will receive a postural and gait screening and their spines are examined for scoliosis. The nurse may also be weighing and measuring the children. This data is confidential for each student and is entered into his/her school health record. If the nurse finds an irregularity with your child’s vision or hearing, you will receive the details and a request for follow-up with a physician. A referral following school screening does not mean that your child needs glasses, has a hearing deficit or has scoliosis. It does mean, however, that further evaluation is needed.

 

 

Change of Clothes

All students should have a change of clothing, to be left at school (weather appropriate). Many situations arise when students both female and male alike, could use a change of clothing. Examples: Raining/snowy weather, spilled food, personal hygiene.

 

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Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye)

Conjunctivitis (pink eye) is an inflammation of the eye that is caused by a bacteria, virus, or allergies. If conjunctivitis is caused by a virus or bacteria, it is easily spread. The protocol for responding to cases of conjunctivitis is as follows:
  1. Any student with symptoms of bacterial or viral conjunctivitis will be excluded from school until symptoms have resolved
  2. The student has been treated for 24 hours.
  3. A note from the doctor stating it is related to allergies.
References for information on this topic include the following: Red Book; 2009 Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases, American Academy of Pediatrics p.144State of Delaware, Department of Education, School Nursing: Technical Assistance Manual (Feb 2006), Section C, pp. 39-40.

 

 

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FEVER

Normal body temperatures typically range from 97.6 to 99.6 degrees orally; however temperatures can fluctuate during the day or with specific activities. Most references agree that an oral temperature greater than 100 degrees is a low-grade fever. Fevers are a symptom of the underlying cause of the fever should be determined. Most often, fevers are caused by infections.The protocol for responding to cases of fever is as follows:
  1. Any child with a temperature greater than 100 degrees will be excluded from school.
  2. Any child who is excluded from school due to a fever will have temperature in a normal range (less than 100 degrees) for 24 hours without taking Tylenol (Acetaminophen) or Motrin (Ibuprofen) prior to returning to school.

References for information on this topic include the following: Kids Health.org, Larissa Hirsch, MD Aug 2009.State of Delaware, Department of Education, School Nursing : Technical Assistance Manual (Feb 2006), Section C, p.43.

 

 

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Impetigo

Impetigo is a skin infection caused by either staphylococcal or streptococcal bacteria. Impetigo is extremely contagious a can spread quickly to other students. The protocol for responding to cases of impetigo is as follows:
  1. Any child with a rash that appears to be impetigo will be excluded from school for 24 hours after treatment has begun to prevent the spread to other students.
  2. A doctor’s note must be provided upon return to school.

References for information on this topic include: Red Book: 2009 Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases, American Academy of Pediatrics. p.129State of Delaware, Department of Education, School Nursing: Technical Assistance Manual (Feb 2006), Section C, p. 48.

 

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PEDICULOSIS (Head Lice):

Guidelines and protocols reflect evidence-based practices for our policies implemented within our school. We will periodically provide families of ALL children information for diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of head lice. For more information regarding head lice please visit: http://identify.us.com.Head lice are small parasitic insects exquisitely adapted to living mainly on the scalp and neck hairs of their host. Their presence does not connote a lack of hygiene or sanitation of their host. Head lice are not able to fly or jump and can be acquired by direct contact with an infected person. The most common symptom is itching. Individuals with head lice infestation may scratch the scalp to alleviate itching. The new guidelines say that head lice infestation does not warrant exclusion from school, mass screening, or notification of classmates.